5 tips for bushwalking

Tasmanians love to bushwalk. Having returned from the Three Capes Track with one young adult and two young people in tow, I thought I’d share the top five useful things from the walk. Some I’ve learnt over the years from walkers far more experienced than me and others I found on the track.

  1. Keep your gear in specially marked bags

If I’m travelling for a long time or if I’m camping, I like to pack like-gear together in smaller bags. I can find things without pulling everything apart. I’ve noticed when I’m camping that I put my things away differently then forget where they are the next day.

Here’s the number one tip for camping: mark each storage bag with its contents eg ‘day time’, ‘night time’, ‘toiletries’, ‘personal items’, ‘breakfast’ etc. Keep gear together that is used for the same function and stick to it eg ‘night time’ contains sleepwear, head torch and earplugs and ‘personal items’ might include a book if you’ve taken one and where you keep your watch.

  1. Entertainment

The Three Capes Track has USB chargers and some connectivity but it’s unlikely to provide the capacity for the sort of gaming most young people enjoy. There are plenty of old fashioned board games at each hut site but we took two of our own – Entropy and Code Names. Most of our group were familiar with the games. It easily became the evening’s entertainment with everyone looking forward each afternoon to playing again.

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  1. Fun and tasty food

Just because you’re camping, doesn’t mean you have to eat two minute noodles every night. I borrowed Lovely Cathy’s dehydrator and cooked up a feast. Dehydrated berries were a good addition to the morning porridge. Dinners were Asian style pork mince with ginger, bok choy, carrots and noodles, the camping classic – spaghetti bolognaise and Mexican chicken mince in soft tacos.

Yum! Looks great doesn't it?!
Yum! Looks great doesn’t it?!

Scroggin is a must have – try sultanas, apricots, dried cranberries, cashews, almonds, M&Ms and peanut M&Ms. This time I also added a couple of coconut apricot balls which were almost as popular as the chocolate. We took the 2 pm boat to the walk so we ate at the Dunalley Bakery earlier and I froze a round of ham and cheese rolls for day 2. Other lunches were wraps with either peanut butter or cheese and grated carrot and beetroot. Dessert each night was chocolate – giant Toblerones or a block of Cadburys, something that won’t easily melt. I did make a fruit and nut slice and froze it for snacks on the first day.

I dehydrated the Asian pork sand vegetables separately. It took around an hour to rehydrate. I used more heat and water on subsequent nights which helped speed things up. Dehydrating your own food is much more cost effective than buying pre-made camping food and generally tastier.
I dehydrated the Asian pork sand vegetables separately. It took around an hour to rehydrate. I used more heat and water on subsequent nights which helped speed things up. Dehydrating your own food is much more cost effective than buying pre-made camping food and generally tastier.
  1. Spare Socks

I’m not joking.

They get lost on bush walks just like at home.

  1. A good first aid kit

You might use nothing but it’s worth its weight. Some of the things that I include is anti-inflammatories and analgesic, a bandage for snakebite, sunscreen, tampons, anti-histamine and most importantly Compeed blister bandaids. As soon as you feel discomfort on your feet, put one on and don’t remove it until it falls off. It’s like a second layer of skin. It will become water logged but don’t worry, just leave it there as long as possible.

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The tip that isn’t numbered – earplug, if for no other reason than you don’t have to hear yourself snore.

Here’s our post on the Three Capes Track.

For more information on Entropy and Code Names.

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